2018 CCBC Presentations


DAY ONE: Tuesday 9 October 2018
 

Session 1: New Approach: a Zero Carbon Bill & Climate Commission

The Government has just completed consultation on the Zero Carbon Bill and independent Commission modelled on the UK example. It is investigating how to address rising transport emissions. An Interim Climate Commission is already looking at how to reduce agricultural emissions and reach 100% renewable electricity. The Interim Commission, Deep South Challenge, amongst others, have been looking at the important role of Mātauranga Māori in our transition plan, and how to spread the costs of change. The Climate Adaptation Technical Working Group has identified crucial ‘building blocks’ for responding to the impacts of climate change across the environment, economy, and society. This session explores the outcomes of consultation on the Bill and progress on the other pieces of the new climate policy framework.

Session sponsored by Ports of Auckland

Chair: Rachel Brown, ONZM, CEO, Sustainable Business Network

Keynote: Aotearoa’s transition plan: the outcomes of consultation and the Government’s climate policy package
Hon James Shaw, Minister for Climate Change

Keynote: The two arms of a just transition: Mātauranga Māori and our transition plan, and spreading the costs of change
Dr Dan Hikuroa, Senior Lecturer Māori Studies, University of Auckland

Keynote: Policy update: the ETS, 1 billion trees, Transport, the Interim Commission, Adaptation TWG - Where are things at and how do they fit together?
Vicky Robertson, Secretary for the Environment, Ministry for the Environment

Respondent: Aotearoa’s transition plan: the position of the opposition
Hon Scott Simpson, MP For Coromandel

Listen to the audio recording of Session 1

 

Session 2: New Business: Innovating for Climate

A Zero Carbon Act will bring structure to the national transition to net zero which will inevitably have implications for how kiwis’ do business. Leading climate lawyer Simon Watt will examine what those are. But the legislative framework is only one piece of the puzzle. More and more global and New Zealand businesses are taking the market opportunities a transition to a low carbon economy offers. The questions are why and how? The Sustainable Business Council's Abbie Reynolds and leading CEOs will explore what’s required to galvanise and facilitate business innovating for climate action.

Session sponsored by Bell Gully

Chair & Moderator: Rebecca Macfie, Senior Journalist

Keynote: The rules of the game: business implications of the Zero Carbon Bill
Simon Watt, Partner, Bell Gully

Keynote: Playing the game: the why and how of making sustainable business the new normal
Abbie Reynolds, CEO, Sustainable Business Council

Panel:
James Kilty, Chief Generation & Development Officer, Contact Energy
Donna Flavell, CEO, Waikato Tainui
Kirk Hope, CEO, Business NZ
Rob Spurway, COO, Fonterra
Rachel Mackintosh, VP, Council of Trade Unions

Listen to the audio recording of Session 2



Session 3: New for NZ, Old Hat for Others

This afternoon's sessions are brought to you in conjunction with the Institute of Directors.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS EXPERIENCES UNDER CLIMATE TRANSITION STRATEGIES

The proposal for a national, staged, transition strategy is not unique. The UK, Ireland, and Sweden have put into law a process for progressive carbon budgets and adaptation interventions. Luxembourg, among others, has deployed a Jeremy Rifkin developed Third Industrial Revolution transition plan. In this session leading businesses share insights on operating within national climate transition frameworks. What are the opportunities they present? How do you maximise those? Where are the pitfalls? What are the other drivers for business climate action, and does an Act really make a difference?

Chair: H E Mr Bernard Savage, Ambassador of the European Union to New Zealand

Keynote: The UK Climate Act: what’s worked, what hasn’t, and what NZ can do better
Chris Stark, CEO, UK Climate Change Commission

Keynotes: Doing business under the UK’s Climate Change Act 2008
Mike Barry, Director of Sustainable Business, Marks and Spencer (pre-record interview)


David Riley, Head of Carbon and Energy, Anglian Water Services

Keynote: Carrot or Stick? Incentivising Sustainable Business Practices in the fashion industry
Qiuale Wong, Head of Product, Common Objective

Listen to the audio recording of Session 3



Session 4: It Starts in the Board Room: changing the business climate

Session sponsored by Air New Zealand.

Boards of directors need to focus on climate change to ensure competitiveness, reputation, and resilience into the future. But what does ‘climate risk’ on the Board Agenda actually mean? What information should directors be expecting from management, and what questions should they be asking? How do corporate boards gauge and respond to climate risks thoughtfully and effectively? In this session directors will work together to unravel the answers to those questions.

Chair & moderator: Kirsten Patterson, CEO, Institute of Directors

Keynote: Understanding and fulfilling your fiduciary duty
Sarah Barker, Special Counsel, Minter Ellison Australia

A New Zealand perspective
Lloyd Kavanagh, Board Chair & Partner Financial Services, MinterEllisonRuddWatts

Keynote: How to translate complex sustainability trends and climate change into strategic business decisions & effectively advise and challenge your executive team
Pip Best, Director - New Zealand Climate Change and Sustainability Services Team, EY

Panel: From both sides of the Board table - integrating sustainability and climate change into operational decisions
Rob Campbell, Director
Viv Heslop, Head of Transport Sustainability, Auckland Transport
Lloyd Kavanagh, Director
Mary Quin, Director
Raveen Jadurham, CEO, Watercare
Sophie Heighway, Sustainability Initiatives Manager, Auckland Council

Listen to the audio recording of Session 4


DAY TWO: Wednesday 10 October 2018

 
Breakfast Session: Activity in the International Arena Heating Up

2018 is an important year for the Paris Agreement. At COP24 parties should finally agree to the rule book for implementing the global goal of keeping global temperature rise well below 2 degrees C. As the draft rules are being negotiated, many countries, states, and cities have started to take action; both positive and negative. Emissions trading schemes are emerging, investment is being scaled-up, and transition and adaptation plans are being developed. In other places the physical impacts of climate change are becoming more and more prominent and urgent. This session will explore why these international developments are relevant to New Zealand.

Chair: Madeleine Wright, Programme Manager, Climate Change & Business Conference; Senior Solicitor, Environmental Defence Society

Keynote: Why New Zealand business should care about the Paris rulebook
Kay Harrison, Lead Negotiator International Carbon Markets, Ministry for the Environment

Keynote: Whose decisions really matter? Implications of nation-state and nation’s states’ decision-making for New Zealand Business
Rod Oram, business journalist, The Newsroom
 

Session 5: Solutions - Planning the Transition

Climate change decision-making is an iterative risk-management process. The speed at which technology is developing and uncertainty over impacts and emissions trajectories mean opportunities for learning and mid-course corrections are imperative. Both adaptation and mitigation pathways must be flexible, and they must be inter-connected. This session explores why business should take a joined up decision-making approach to mitigation and adaptation, the process for developing an integrated response strategy, and the building blocks for low-emission adaptation.

Session sponsored by Auckland Council

Chair: Rebecca Mills, Founder & Managing Director, The Lever Room; Board Member, The Deep South Challenge

Keynote: Dynamic Adaptive Pathways Planning (DAPP) – integrating adaptation and mitigation into the transition to the future
Judy Lawrence, Senior Research Fellow at the NZ Climate Change Research Institute; Former Co-Chair of the Climate Change Adaptation Technical Working Group (CCATWG)

Implementation case studies:
Time for a Change: an international perspective on integrated & innovative climate action
John Mauro, Chief Sustainability Officer, Auckland Council

Sometimes it’s not your call - implications of local authority adaptation planning for business
David Cull, President, LGNZ

So you want insurance?
Martin Hunter, Chief Risk Officer, IAG

Listen to the audio recording of Session 5
 

Concurrent Session 6 1.1: The Emperor’s new clothes: implications of a tuned up ETS

SOLUTIONS - BANKING ON CLIMATE

Climate-resilient, low-carbon investment is needed at an unprecedented speed and scale. The introduction of a Zero Carbon Act should help bring the certainty and stability needed for investment. But the question still remains: how do businesses pay for the transition to new operating models? The workshops explore four different tools for financing the transition to a low emissions economy.

Stream 1.1 – The Emperor’s new clothes: implications of a tuned up ETS
To date the ETS has been New Zealand’s key legislated measure to reduce climate emissions. Unfortunately weak settings have rendered it ineffective. But this is starting to change. The combination of removing the two-for-one exception and release of the Zero Carbon Bill and ETS Consultation Documents has seen the carbon price steadily rise.  Precisely where the Government will go with further changes is not yet clear but the Interim Climate Commission is giving this serious thought. This workshop looks at how to manage risk from changes to the carbon price, what New Zealand can learn from other ETS around the world, and explores the implications of the ETS needed to transition to net zero.

Chair & opening keynote: The carbon price - how to manage risk
Nigel Brunel, Director Financial Markets, OMF

Keynote: International lessons – California, China, and the EU ETS
Christina Hood, Climate Policy Consultant

Q&A: opinions from the inside
Julian McCree, Genesis Energy
David Rhodes, CEO, NZ Forest Owners Association
Emily Spears, BP

Listen to the audio recording of Session 6 1.1
 

Concurrent Session 6 1.2: Green bonds: favouring sustainability

SOLUTIONS - BANKING ON CLIMATE

Climate-resilient, low-carbon investment is needed at an unprecedented speed and scale. The introduction of a Zero Carbon Act should help bring the certainty and stability needed for investment. But the question still remains: how do businesses pay for the transition to new operating models? The workshops explore four different tools for financing the transition to a low emissions economy.

Stream 1.2 – Green bonds: favouring sustainability

There is an increasing desire from lenders and investors to specifically finance green initiatives. Certified green bonds enable that to happen. This workshop explores how to leverage finance through green bond programmes, takes a look at the pending Green Bond exchange platform, and then, with the help of existing programme operators, delves into how Green Bond programmes work in practice: How hard are they to administer? How do you drive uptake? What are the future opportunities? What infrastructure or policy settings are required to facilitate uptake?

Chair: Fiona Doddrell, Director, Debt Capital Markets, Westpac

Keynote: Green bonds 101:how to create a green bonds programme
Ben Mayer, Consultant Climate Change & Sustainability Services, EY

Keynote: Linking financers with initiatives – the platform on the near horizon
Joanna Lawn, Head of Issuer Relations, NZX

Q&A: Learning from experience
Andrew Eagles, CEO, NZ Green Building Council
Alec Tang, Principal Specialist Corporate Sustainability, Auckland Council
Louise Tong, Contact Energy


Concurrent Session 6 2.1: Greening the books: divestment & reinvestment

SOLUTIONS – BANKING ON CLIMATE
Climate-resilient, low-carbon investment is needed at an unprecedented speed and scale. The introduction of a Zero Carbon Act should help bring the certainty and stability needed for investment. But the question still remains: how do businesses pay for the transition to new operating models? The workshops explore four different tools for financing the transition to a low emissions economy.

Stream 2.1 – Greening the books: divestment & reinvestment
Divestment away from fossil fuels is accelerating. In New Zealand NZ Superfund, Otago and Victoria Universities lead the charge. Auckland Council has followed suit. But what does divestment actually entail? How should decisions to reinvest be made? This workshop delves into the answers to those questions while making the business case for divestment.

Chair: Grant Guilford, Vice-Chancellor, Victoria University

Keynote: No insurance no investment – the coal industry
Tim Grafton, CEO, Insurance Council of NZ

Case studies: Learning from experience: the why and how of divestment

Rishab Sethi, Manager External Investments & Partnerships, NZ Superfund

Grant Guilford, Vice-Chancellor, Victoria University

Keynote: How to approach reinvestment
Karen Silk, General Manager, Commercial, Corporate & Institutional, Westpac

Listen to the audio recording of Session 6 2.1

 

Concurrent Session 6 2.2: Disclosure: the power of reporting

SOLUTIONS – BANKING ON CLIMATE
Climate-resilient, low-carbon investment is needed at an unprecedented speed and scale. The introduction of a Zero Carbon Act should help bring the certainty and stability needed for investment. But the question still remains: how do businesses pay for the transition to new operating models? The workshops explore four different tools for financing the transition to a low emissions economy.

Stream 2.2 – Disclosure: the power of reporting
Companies and investors alike are coming under increasing pressure to report on emissions profiles and physical climate risk exposure. The Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure (TCFD), led by Michael Bloomberg, has released voluntary reporting guidelines which are beginning to be picked internationally. There is a slowly growing trend for mandatory environmental risk reporting generally, with NZX’s requirements being an example. Even where it isn’t required, as climate issues become more central to core business and companies are putting in place robust, cross-cutting climate strategies, changes to reporting are inevitable. The UK Climate Act does not make climate risk reporting mandatory; should New Zealand’s Zero Carbon Act? This session explores the business case for transparent and thorough reporting on climate change.

Chair: Roseline Klein, Head of Water Value, Watercare

Keynote: Why following the TCFD recommendations is smart business
Emma Herd, Investor Group on Climate Change, CEO

Keynote: Get on board or be left behind - global trends in climate reporting
Jeremy Burke, Trustee, CPD
 

Concurrent Session 7 1.1: Defining the path: setting science based targets & the SDGs


THE CASE FOR CLIMATE: TRANSFORMING BUSINESS AS USUAL
The technologies of today already offer businesses ways to increase profit while reducing emissions and increasing resilience. We can only image what the technologies of tomorrow bring for those prepared to seize them. These workshops look at four BAU game changers for setting your business on a path to success in a low emissions economy.

Stream 1.1 – Defining the path: setting science based targets & the Sustainable Development Goals
Internationally, setting GHG emissions reduction targets based on climate science is becoming the norm as companies aim to align internal climate plans with Paris goals. A handful of New Zealand companies are leading the charge at home. This workshop outlines what a science based target is, the four step process for setting one, and why it makes good business sense to do it.

Chair & opening comments: The SDGs – the starting point
Ann Smith, CEO, Enviro-Mark Solutions

Keynote: Science based targets - the why
David Tong, Campaigner, WWF

Keynote: Science based targets - the how
Stu McKenzie, Enviro-Mark Solutions

Case studies:
Auckland Airport: Helen Jenkins, Sustainability & Environment Manager

Contact Energy: Kaapua Smith, Head of Sustainability, Contact Energy

Listen to the audio recording of Session 7 1.1

 

Concurrent Session 7 1.2: Packaging sustainability

THE CASE FOR CLIMATE: TRANSFORMING BUSINESS AS USUAL
The technologies of today already offer businesses ways to increase profit while reducing emissions and increasing resilience. We can only image what the technologies of tomorrow bring for those prepared to seize them. These workshops look at four BAU game changers for setting your business on a path to success in a low emissions economy.

Stream 1.2 – Packaging sustainability: profiling climate interventions and driving consumer demand
Sustainability, reducing emissions, and adapting to climate risks are no longer simply bolt-ons to a BAU approach, but something that must become deeply embedded in day-to-day business operations. But differing levels of knowledge and interest mean interweaving sustainability across a business and successful external marketing is not easy. In this workshop participants explore strategies for conveying the importance of sustainability, the business-logic for placing it at the core of operations and strategy, and how to successfully market climate conscious business decisions and sustainable products to increase demand as well as efficiency.

Chair & opening keynote:Lisa Daniell, Head of Sustainability, Air New Zealand

Keynote: Marketing net zero
Livia Esterhazy, CEO WWF; previous Managing Director at Clemenger BBDO

Inspire your people : climate storytelling to grow internal action
Kath Dewar, GoodSense

Interactive workshop: In groups, delegates will consider a scenario and develop an internal and external 'marketing' plan

Concurrent Session 7 2.1: Powering the future

SOLUTIONS – THE CASE FOR CLIMATE: TRANSFORMING BUSINESS AS USUAL
The technologies of today already offer businesses ways to increase profit while reducing emissions and increasing resilience. We can only image what the technologies of tomorrow bring for those prepared to seize them. These workshops look at four BAU game changers for setting your business on a path to success in a low emissions economy.

Stream 2.1 – Powering the future
New Zealand prides itself on being 80% renewable electricity. But progress has been slow on tackling the last 20%. And even slower in addressing its ever-rising transportation emissions. Solutions are out there for businesses to take powering the future into their own hands. How do you accelerate the transition to EVs? Is solar the answer? What role can emerging ICT technologies play?

Chair: Alison Howard, Head of Sustainability, Meridian Energy

Keynote: Tackling the last 20%
Professor Ralph Sims, Massey University; IPCC lead author

Case studies: Solutions
How to pitch the switch: moving to EVs
Clem Arlidge, Senior Advisor, EECA

Demand for change – the important role of consumers in decarbonising our electricity supply
Fraser Clark, Associate, Advisian

Listen to the audio recording of Session 7 2.1



Concurrent Session 7 2.2: Finding an answer for agriculture

SOLUTIONS – THE CASE FOR CLIMATE: TRANSFORMING BUSINESS AS USUAL
The technologies of today already offer businesses ways to increase profit while reducing emissions and increasing resilience. We can only image what the technologies of tomorrow bring for those prepared to seize them. These workshops look at four BAU game changers for setting your business on a path to success in a low emissions economy.

Stream 2.2 – Finding an answer for agriculture
New Zealand’s million dollar climate change question is how to control non-carbon agricultural emissions. New Zealand cannot deny that agricultural emissions are a significant component of its overall emissions and so if we are to meet our obligations under the Paris Agreement, must be reduced; as per the Vivid Report New Zealand “cannot get away with not reducing methane”. Action needs to be taken now because the longer we take the more stringent interventions will need to be to be effective, and the more severe impacts on communities will be. What that action should be will be influenced by the global future of food, because New Zealand’s current model is unlikely to stay. What does this transition mean for NZ Inc? What are the solutions available right now to start the transition to low or no emissions farming? How can New Zealand position itself to lead the global transition?

Session sponsored by Fonterra

Chair: Carolyn Mortland, Director, Social Responsibility, Fonterra

Keynote: The future of protein: Where traditional agriculture fits and what that means for NZ Inc
Ariel Muller, Director Asia-Pacific, Forum for the Future

Back-to-back analysis: Targets & baskets - How to deal with short lived gases?
Dave Frame, Professor of Climate Change, School of Geography, Environment and Earth Science, Victoria University of Wellington
James Young Drew, Policy Lead - Zero Carbon Act, Generation Zero


Session 8: The 2 ‘Gs’: Our Greatest Environmental Challenge is Our Greatest Economic Opportunity


If New Zealand is going to achieve net zero by 2050 it needs to turn the tide on its rising emissions profile, and fast. Even then some physical impacts from changing temperatures are unavoidable. The slower that transition is the greater the financial losses and the more severe the physical impacts. But what is that transition to? What are the roles of Maori and western knowledge in developing a transition pathway? And how do we ensure the social impacts are equally spread?

Chair & opening keynote: Hon David Parker, Minister for the Environment

Keynote: A clean, green, prosperous and competitive future New Zealand
Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern, Prime Minister (video pre-record)


Listen to the audio of Session 8

Last updated at 10:09AM on November 1, 2018